Coursework

The ICI staff can facilitate specialized course work in your community through the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education and Human Development.  Courses link with:

All courses can lead to degrees at UMass Boston in EECIS and/or Teacher Licensure.

Courses

Foundations of Early Education and Care (ECHD 201, 601)

Introduction to Infant and Toddler Care and Education (ECHD 208)

Child Growth and Development Birth to Age Eight – Including Special Needs (ECHD 211, 611)

Supporting Young Children’s Social Interactions and Emotional Growth (ECHD 221, 621)

Internship in Early Education and Care I (ECHD 290)

Responsibilities and Ethics in Early Education and Care (ECHD 317)

Sociocultural Perspectives: Building Family, Community and School Relationships (EDCG 406, 606)

Instructional Strategies for All Young Children With a Focus on Creative Arts (ECHD  420, 620)

Observing, Documenting and Assessing in Early Childhood (ECHD 422, 622)

Technology for All Young Children (ECHD 430)

Family Systems, Support and Engagement (ECHD 435)

Language Development and Literacy in Early Childhood (ECHD 440, 640)

Science and Mathematics Instruction for All Young Children (ECHD 441, 641)

HeadsUp! Reading (EDCG 445)

Understanding Reading: Principles and Practices (EDCG 446, 646)

Sheltered English Instruction (ECHD 449)

Leadership in Early Education and Care (ECHD 450)

Youth Education in Out-of-School Settings Through Community-Based and Youth Service Organizations (ECHD 457)

Administration and Supervision of Programs for Young Children (ECHD 459)

Early Intervention: Curriculum, Methods, and Services (ECHD 466)

Early Childhood Literacy Internship (EDCG 485)

Exploring Early Literacy Mentoring (ECHD 487, 687)

Planning for Meaningful Early Childhood Curriculum/Practicum I – Birth to PreK (ECHD 490, 690)

Teacher Inquiry/Practicum II (K-2) (ECHD 491, 691)

Internship in Early Education and Care II (ECHD 492) 

Early Childhood Services

Institute for Community Inclusion

University of Massachusetts Boston

Program Descriptions

Foundations of Early Education and Care (ECHD 201, 601) This introductory course focuses on the principles of early childhood education and early intervention, including facilities, staff, goals, and methodology of various programs such as child care, Head Start, and nursery school. Traditional and contemporary issues in early childhood education and early intervention approaches will be considered, and emphasis will be placed on meeting the needs of the all children within the family culture. 10 hours of clinical experience.

Introduction to Infant and Toddler Care and Education (ECHD 208) This course examines the specialized needs of infants and toddlers with regard to language development, nutrition, motor and social abilities, and family-child relations. Types of programs serving infants, toddlers, and their families, focusing on the design of optimal environments and curricula, will be studied. Special topic issues of health and safety, relationship to caring for infants and toddlers, etc. will be explored in depth.

Child Growth and Development Birth to Age Eight – Including Special Needs (ECHD 211, 611) The course overviews typical and atypical development from birth through age eight, including: theories of development, implications of atypical development on play/learning, understanding early childhood development within an ecological framework, and exploring what brain research tells about the early years. Knowledge of predictable sequences of growth and change in children provides a framework from which teachers prepare the learning environment and plan appropriate experiences for individuals and groups. The course requirements include 10 hours of clinical experience.

Supporting Young Children’s Social Interactions and Emotional Growth (ECHD 221, 621) Using research on child development, this course will emphasize the teacher/child relationship as a cornerstone in helping all young children to become enthusiastic learners. Students will connect the importance of establishing strong relationships with and among children to foster a positive learning environment and to effectively engage young children in a learning community. Students will learn how to use direct/indirect techniques to guide young children to engage in self-regulation using developmentally appropriate guidance strategies. Based on observation of young children, students will identify potential underlying causes of childhood behaviors. Upon completion, students will be able to interact appropriately with children and families, engage children in problem solving, and promote conflict resolution, self-control, self-motivation, self-esteem, cultural awareness, and effective communication skills in children. 10 hours of clinical experience.

Internship in Early Education and Care I (ECHD 290) This course provides individuals with an opportunity to apply their knowledge of child development and teaching techniques to practice as they delve into early childhood education through a supervised internship. Students will demonstrate their ability to facilitate learning through active involvement and interaction with children, parents, and other professionals as they plan, implement, and evaluate programs for young children. Students must teach in an early childhood education program a minimum of 20 hours per week for a total of 300 hours per semester and attend weekly seminars. Students must also set up weekly conferences with their cooperating teacher and arrange three on-site supervised visits in which university staff will observe and then conference with the student and cooperating teacher. Prerequisites: ECHD 201, ECHD 211, and ECHD 221.

Responsibilities and Ethics in Early Education and Care (ECHD 317) In this course, early education and care students will explore ethics and responsibilities inherent in the roles of working with children and families. Everyday encounters may present difficult situations in which the “right thing” is not always clear. Diverse perspectives will be identified to develop an understanding of ethical concepts and safeguards. Ethical codes of conduct will be applied to case studies to develop a thoughtful process to resolve ethical or legal conflicts, especially in working with diverse populations. Students will reflect on ethical responsibilities to children, families, colleagues, communities, and the profession.

Sociocultural Perspectives: Building Family, Community and School Relationships (EDCG 406, 606) Examine the interrelationships among students, schools, and society. Learn about the ways in which race, class, gender, language, culture, and ethnicity influence how we define each other and ourselves within the broader culture of U.S. society. Explore the historical antecedents influencing the lives of exclusive and diverse peoples of the United States, as a foundation for understanding the policies, goals, assumptions, strategies, and practices of multicultural approaches to education. Draw on various models to construct educational curricula that are multicultural and socially re-constructionist. Within the context of public schooling today, read about how to develop students’ “cultural consciousness” of our shared societal assumptions, experiences, and/or interactions with individuals from diverse backgrounds. Prepracticum experiences will deepen understanding of the interrelationships among students, schools, and society.

Instructional Strategies for All Young Children With a Focus on Creative Arts (ECHD 420, 620) Integrate understanding of academic disciplines; of relationships with children and families; and of developmentally effective approaches to teaching and learning to design, implement, and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning for all children. Explore the central role of play in the education of young children, the multiple intelligences of children, and the use of the creative arts to assist learning. Prepracticum experiences will show the central role of play in young children’s learning and also will a wide range of settings.

Observing, Documenting and Assessing in Early Childhood (ECHD 422, 622) This course will examine early childhood measurement and assessment techniques. It will also discuss fundamentals of psychometric theory, structure and uses of standardized tests; and skills for alternative classroom assessment techniques for child study. The course will use systematic observations, documentation, and other effective assessment strategies in responsible ways, to partner with families and other professionals, and to positively influence children’s development and learning. This course requires 10 hours of clinical observation in various settings, including: natural settings (home, child care, Head Start) and medical settings. 10 hours of clinical experience.

Technology for All Young Children (ECHD 430) Examine the learning outcomes, instructional methods, and materials used for instructional technology: Early Childhood to Second Grade (PreK-2). Learn how to apply the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to curriculum, instruction, and assessment to support all children in natural environments. Explore software for early literacy development in young children. Experience hands-on use of hardware (e.g., printer, scanner, and digital camera) and software.  Review adaptations for special needs children (e.g., switch options and construction). Learn how to integrate the use of Augmentative or Adaptive Communication (AAC) systems across the curriculum and at home. Learn how to increase family participation and gain knowledge of how to use technology with their child.

Family Systems, Support, and Engagement (ECHD 435) Students will reflect on how modern families are shaped by changes in society and family structures and how such changes impact parenting. Such societal shifts impact the relationship between early childhood practitioners and families, requiring strong partnership, effective communication, and ongoing ways to involve families in the education process. Throughout this course, practitioners working with children and families will increase skills and knowledge to assist families in supporting their children’s social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development. A strengths-based approach to empowering families will be maintained throughout the course. Students will investigate many factors that influence the healthy development of families and their impact on the parent/child relationship. 10 hours of clinical experience.

Language Development and Literacy in Early Childhood (ECHD 440, 640) This course explores language development from infants through primary-aged children. Topics include speech and language processes for communication, language development stages, theories of language acquisition, assessment of language development and activities to foster language development. Attention is given to linguistically diverse populations as well as to children who language development is different from the expected norm. Also explored are theory and research on literacy development, including selection and development of pre-reading/pre-writing and reading and writing curricula for preschool, kindergarten, and primary grades. Emphasis is on development of literacy in the primary grades. 10 hours of clinical experiences.

Science and Mathematics Instruction for All Young Children (ECHD 441, 641) Explore the developmental theory and research in each of the curriculum areas, foundation for selection, design of curriculum materials, and activities appropriate for children from birth through the primary grades. Fundamental concepts and skills for young children will be learned as well as optimal, hands-on pedagogical methods. Implementation of math and science of developmentally appropriate practices for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and primary children will be presented. Spend 10 hours observing in early intervention, preschool and/or public school programs.

HeadsUp! Reading (EDCG 445) The goal of the course is to strengthen teacher practices to improve literacy outcomes for young children. The research-based principles and practices provide a strong foundation in early reading and writing within a developmentally appropriate approach for children from birth through age five. The course focuses on the myths of literacy learning, practical application, and creating a common language and understanding of early literacy. This on-campus course combines an interactive distance-learning format with facilitated group discussion and activities. 

Understanding Reading: Principles and Practices (EDCG 446, 646) Introduction to theoretical and instructional issues involved in the acquisition of literacy. The course will provide research-based practical constructs for knowledgeable decision making; students will consider effective ways of creating and managing an inclusionary, balanced literacy-development program, which addresses the needs of children who are culturally and linguistically diverse. Topics include: oral language and the impacts of emergent literacy development; lesson planning, with particular attention to selection of appropriate literacy materials; strategies for beginning reading and writing; literacy development for English language learners; and strengthening family literacy connections. Across topics, emphasis is on the teacher’s roll as an observer, and the use of assessment to guide instruction. This course is taken with ECHD 490 or ECHD 491, a full-time practicum.

Sheltered English Instruction (ECHD 449) This course furnishes all practitioners with the instructional strategies, knowledge, and practice needed to successfully teach second-language learners. The course is designed to equip early education and care practitioners with skills to effectively organize and implement content-area instruction appropriate for different levels of English proficiency, be it in public-school settings or after-school programs. The myriad student language backgrounds encountered in increasingly diverse urban educational settings are discussed. This is a three-credit course requiring a minimum of 10 hours pre-practicum.

Leadership in Early Education and Care (ECHD 450) Expand the role of leader and advocate in the movement toward universally accessible, high-quality early-childhood programs. Explore the role of a broad-based, inclusive leadership to make changes in the early education and care system, as well as, improve the jobs of teachers and providers. Discuss the theoretical frameworks and practice concrete skill development. Implement a leadership action plan as a part of the course requirements.

Youth Education in Out-of-School Settings Through Community-Based and Youth Service Organizations (ECHD 457) This course explores the praxis of youth education within contexts of neighborhoods, communities, and institutions outside of school. Informed by holistic models of youth, family, and community development, the course provides students with strategies for understanding and engaging effectively with youth in relevant out-of-school contexts and for developing successful collaborations with community partners. Specific attention is given to the social/historical/political profiles and institutional resources of Boston’s multicultural, multilingual communities. 10 hours of clinical experience.

Administration and Supervision of Programs for Young Children (ECHD 459) Overview of the components involved in administering a program for young children. Includes goal setting; facilities; budget and finances; record keeping; staff relationships and training; parent and community involvement; federal, state, and local agencies; and relevant national trends and their effect on early-childhood programs.

Early Intervention: Curriculum, Methods, and Services (ECHD 466) The course covers curriculum and intervention in early-childhood services, including discussions of: 1) what is meant by a curriculum framework for young children; 2) elements of a curriculum framework for early intervention; 3) overview and comparison of various early-intervention curricular models and approaches; 4) current issues and trends related to early-intervention curriculum; and 5) strategies for creating effective learning ecologies for diverse groups of young children with special needs. Special focus will be on brain development during the first three years of life, identification of family strengths within context of diverse cultures, building reciprocal relationships with infants and toddlers and their families, supporting families to identify goals for infants and toddlers with special needs, and providing support services for families in home settings. The course also prepares personnel with the skills necessary to be effective members of interdisciplinary teams that operate from a developmental framework and that incorporate a family-guided approach to early-intervention service delivery. 15 hours of clinical experience.

Early Childhood Literacy Internship (EDCG 485) In the internship in early childhood literacy, students incorporate early literacy theory and technique into their onsite practice in their work as teachers in early childhood classrooms. Students develop their teaching competencies in the area of early literacy. An early literacy specialist from ReadBoston Early Literacy Links provides each student with individual instruction, support, supervision, and evaluation through weekly observations and tutorials as well as regular phone and email contact. Professional readings related to the student’s teaching practice are shared and discussed during the tutorials. Students work in an early childhood classroom during active curriculum periods for a minimum of 5 hours per week, for a total of 75 pre-practicum hours.

Exploring Early Literacy Mentoring (ECHD 487, 687) Explore the various dimensions of the mentoring role with a focus on enhancing critical early literacy knowledge, skills and understandings for teachers of young children. Gain an understanding of adult development, stages of teacher development, and establishing mentoring relationships. Practice a number of mentoring roles, and have conversations with protégés within the context of current early literacy research.  Learn how to connect observations with the Massachusetts Preschool Curriculum Frameworks.

Planning for Meaningful Early Childhood Curriculum/Practicum I – Birth to PreK (ECHD 490, 690) A fourteen-week, full-time practicum field experience in a birth-to-pre-kindergarten setting. Design, implement, and evaluate a meaningful, challenging curriculum that promotes comprehensive developmental and learning outcomes for all young children. Use ethical guidelines and other professional standards related to early childhood practice. Attend a seminar with the university supervisor, to explore the connections between theory and practice and share practicum experiences. Develop teaching competencies, with assistance from both a cooperating teacher and a university supervisor.

Teacher Inquiry/Practicum II (K-2) (ECHD 491, 691) Fourteen-week, full-time practicum field experience providing the opportunity to put theory and technique into practice in a kindergarten, first or second grade classroom. Develop teaching competencies, with assistance from both a certified cooperating teacher and a university supervisor. Attend a seminar with the university supervisor, to explore the connections between theory and practice, share practicum experiences, and work on Teaching Portfolios. Design and implement curriculum, assess individual child and group progress, and observe the role of family and community in children’s education. Develop identify as an early childhood profession.

Internship in Early Education and Care II (ECHD 492) This course explores the application of theory to practice within a fourteen-week internship, requiring a minimum of 300 hours of field experience in the student’s area of concentration. Throughout the internship, practitioners will develop leadership in their early education and care setting, use a problem-solving approach in the application of theory to real-life practice, collect and analyze data to inform practice, and reflect on their internship placement. Seminars with a university supervisor will capitalize on the diversity of program settings to investigate federal and state regulations, research, policy, and practice. Prerequisites: ECHD 290 & ECHD 440; co-requisite: ECHD 422.

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