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Job search/career advancement

A large part of the resources developed at ICI focus on ways people with disabilities can find and keep jobs. Our research-tested methods put the job seeker in the driver's seat, respecting their individual choices while building a good relationship with an employer. Some materials are written for job seekers and some for professionals and other helpers.

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Publications related to Job search/career advancement

Effective Career Development Strategies for Young Artists with Disabilities

The Institute Brief 24

One potential arena of employment for young people with disabilities is the arts. This brief reports on effective strategies that 47 young artists with disabilities used to gain access to arts-related experiences in order to further their educational and career pathways. Across program years 2002–2005, these young artists, all aged 16 to 25, were finalists in the VSA arts/ Volkswagen of America, Inc. Program, an arts competition that was intended to showcase their talents and accomplishments. As part of the overall evaluation, we were able to identify career development strategies based on a review of finalists’ program applications. This brief is mainly targeted at visual artists, although the strategies may also apply to other groups of artists.

The National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers, FY2004-2005 Report 2

Gender Differences in Individual Employment outcomes of People with Developmental Disabilities

Research to Practice Brief, March 2008, Issue 46

Supporting Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Quality Employment Practices

The Institute Brief, Issue No. 25

It has been known for decades that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including those with significant impairment or who have behaviors that others find challenging, can work when they are given appropriate supports (Smith, Belcher, & Juhrs, 1995). It is also clear that individuals with ASD can benefit from employment. Benefits include improved emotional state, greater financial gain, decreased anxiety, greater self-esteem, and greater independence (Mawhood & Howlin, 1999; Hurlbutt & Chalmers, 2004). Nonetheless, employment outcomes for individuals with ASD have traditionally been poor (Bilstedt, Gilberg, & Gilberg, 2005; Howlin, Goode, Hutton, & Rutter, 2004). Even those who do find work are often underemployed or do not hold onto jobs for a long period of time (Mawhood & Howlin, 1999).

Teaching Networking Skills: Paving a Way to Jobs and Careers (Teaching manual)

This curriculum is for trainers working with individuals with limited work experience; its goal is to help those job seekers to become engaged in career and job exploration through Networking. It is designed for professionals working with school-to-work transition-age youth, however it has broad applicability to others with limited work experience. This curriculum give students opportunities to practice and put into use networking skills such as: identifying their own network, approaching people, talking about their skills and interests, learning about what employers look for, exploring careers and job options, and exhibiting good business etiquette. Activities vary to accommodate diverse learning styles, and trainers can select lessons that fit the needs of their groups.

School Days to Pay Days

An Employment Planning Guide for Families of Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

Collaboratively designed by ICI and the Department of Developmental Services, this booklet will help families get started with the school-to-work transition process. Readers will learn about resources, services, and programs available for young adults with intellectual disabilities in Massachusetts; and find inspiration in the many success stories of young adults who have secured fulfilling employment with appropriate supports.

ICI: promoting inclusion for people with disabilities