ICI publications by Heike Boeltzig-Brown

Collaboration between State Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Agencies and State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies: Results of a National Survey

Do state intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) agencies collaborate with their vocational rehabilitation (VR) counterparts? If so, in what ways and how formalized are these collaborative efforts? This Research to Practice Brief provides answers to those and other questions. (4/2011)

Press Release: New Report from ICI on Routes to Employment in US and UK - Strategies to Improve Integrated Service Delivery

In the United States and the United Kingdom there are large numbers of working age people with disabilities who are not working and claiming benefits: 10.6 million in the US and 2.64 million in the UK. This report has identified strategies that Public Employment Services activities in both the US and the UK have used in delivering services in a way that meets the more complex employment support needs of people with disabilities within systems designed for the “universal” job seeker as well as investigating how effective these strategies are in reaching that goal. (6/2009)

Advancing Parent-Professional Leadership: Effective Strategies for Building the Capacity of Parent Advisory Councils in Special Education

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, last amended in 2004 (IDEA 2004), encourages parents and educators to work collaboratively, emphasizing that as a team they are uniquely suited to make decisions that help improve the educational experiences and outcomes of children with disabilities. The Advancing Parent-Professional Leadership in Education (APPLE) Project was funded to develop the leadership skills of parents individually and within their communities. The project took place in Massachusetts, where school districts are required to have a special education parent advisory council (SEPAC). (4/2009)

Effective Career Development Strategies for Young Artists with Disabilities

One potential arena of employment for young people with disabilities is the arts. This brief reports on effective strategies that 47 young artists with disabilities used to gain access to arts-related experiences in order to further their educational and career pathways. Across program years 2002–2005, these young artists, all aged 16 to 25, were finalists in the VSA arts/ Volkswagen of America, Inc. Program, an arts competition that was intended to showcase their talents and accomplishments. As part of the overall evaluation, we were able to identify career development strategies based on a review of finalists’ program applications. This brief is mainly targeted at visual artists, although the strategies may also apply to other groups of artists. (6/2008)

Press Release: Institute for Community Inclusion Bridges Digital Divide

In both the United States and the United Kingdom, some hard-to-reach groups are excluded from online government services and transactions (e-government) through lack of access. This publication identifies technical and social barriers currently limiting access to e-government as well as suggested solutions. By presenting six case studies, Boeltzig and Pilling provide ten recommendations to increase access to and use of the Internet among the hard-to-reach. (7/2007)

The National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers, FY2004-2005 Report 1: Employment Outcomes of People with Developmental Disabilities in Integrated Employment

Where do people with mental retardation and developmental disabilities work? What are their hours, wages, and benefits? This brief covers partial results from a survey that gives a snapshot of the outcomes for recently employed people with developmental disabilities. (7/2006)

The National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers, FY2002-2003 Report 3: Involvement of CRPs in the Ticket to Work and the Workforce Investment Act

This Research to Practice brief examines CRP participation in the Ticket to Work and the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). Findings showed that CRPs were more involved in WIA than the Ticket program. (1/2006)

Taking the Mystery Out of Customer Service

With the current emphasis on universal access to employment services for all members of the community, the workforce development field needs to evaluate service delivery. A "mystery shopper" program is one of many evaluation tools available to ensure continuous quality improvement and customer satisfaction. This technique allows organizations to collect data on the experiences of One-Stop Career Center customers from the customer perspective. The brief includes a sample shopper questionnaire. (10/2004)

Case Studies of Local Boards and One-Stop Centers: Tackling Fiscal Issues

This series of products offers practical solutions for Local Workforce Investment Boards and One-Stop Career Centers as they strive to serve all customers, including those with disabilities. In addition to service delivery, WIA encourages One-Stop partners to share in the operating costs of the One-Stop. While the potential benefits are clear, the practicalities can be complex. This brief shares some of the strategies that One-Stop partners have used to address this challenge. (9/2004)

US and UK Routes to Employment: Strategies to Improve Integrated Service Delivery to People with Disabilities

In this report, the authors examine the experience of the United States and United Kingdom in developing effective strategies for providing integrated service delivery. The report examines what works and what doesn't work, and provides a roadmap to improving services for individuals with disabilities. While more research is needed, the report identifies 12 strategies to strengthen integrated service delivery systems, and to assist individuals with disabilities in gaining and maintaining productive employment. Implementing these strategies can benefit clients, who have the opportunity to realize their potential more fully; the taxpayer, who is paying less for disability assistance; and society at large, which gains the productive skill of talented individuals

Examining Collaboration between State Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Agencies and State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies

Since Fiscal Year 1988, the Institute for Community Inclusion has administered the National Survey of State Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Agencies' Day and Employment Services. The FY 2009 survey included a module to assess the ways in which state intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) agencies collaborate with their state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies to support integrated employment outcomes for adults with IDD. A total of 40 agencies responded to the module. Their responses provide a broader understanding of the relationship between the two types of state agencies, and the ways in which they work together to provide integrated employment services. (3/2011)

The National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers, FY2004-2005 Report 2: Gender Differences in Individual Employment Outcomes of People with Developmental Disabilities

(4/2008)

The National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers, FY2004-2005 Report 2

Research to Practice Brief, March 2008, Issue 46 (3/2008)

Recovery with Results, Not Rhetoric

This report examines ways that the workforce development system can help people with psychiatric disabilities find good jobs. (1/2005)

The National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers, FY2002-2003, Report 2: Non-Work Services

The second in a series exploring the services people with developmental disabilities receive from community rehabilitation providers (CRPs). Despite recent ideological emphasis on work, the majority of CRPs continued to offer non-work programs and a substantial proportion of the people they served were involved in those programs. Overall, the findings raise questions about CRP commitment to community integration. (9/2004)

Creative Involvement of Community-Based Disability Organizations

This series of products offers practical solutions for Local Workforce Investment Boards and One-Stop Career Centers as they strive to serve all customers, including those with disabilities. WIA facilitates partnerships to improve service delivery. Although the state Vocational Rehabilitation agency is the only mandated disability partner, community-based organizations can also work with One-Stops. (9/2004)

The National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers, FY2002-2003, Report 1: Overview of Services and Provider Characteristics

Two briefs examine the services people with developmental disabilities receive from community rehabilitation providers (CRPs). Despite recent emphasis on work in the disability field, people with DD were predominantly in sheltered employment or non-work services. Of people with DD in integrated employment, the majority had individual competitive jobs. However, three group employment models had above-average percentages of individuals with DD. (8/2004)

Economic Engagement: An Avenue to Employment for Individuals with Disabilities

This report summarizes the findings of a panel of experts convened by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and charged with identifying key strategies that would support increased workforce participation by persons with disabilities served and supported through state-based Medicaid Buy-In programs. (10/2004)

Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies Helping People With Psychiatric Disabilities Get Employed: How Far Have We Come? How Far Do We Have to Go?

(4/2013)

Case Studies of Emerging/ Innovative Vocational Rehabilitation Agency Practices in Improving Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities

Case Studies of Promising Practices in Vocational Rehabilitation (4/2013)

ICI: promoting inclusion for people with disabilities