ICI publications by Allison Cohen Hall

Employment Data Systems : Florida's Agency for Persons with Disabilities

The increasing emphasis on government accountability at the state and federal levels has increased interest in and use of outcome data. Moreover, research has found that high performing states in integrated employment generally have a clear and visible data collection system that provides individual outcome data (Hall et al, 2007). But what are the most important elements in designing and using a system? Stakeholders have raised questions regarding creating effective data collection systems, identifying variables with the most utility for influencing policy, and using data as a strategic planning tool. This series is intended to shed light on the successes and challenges of day and employment systems across several states and to provide strategies for other states as they examine their own data collection systems and their impact on their employment priorities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). (3/2011)

Iowa's Governance Group: Facilitating Partnerships That Support Integrated Employment

In 1998, five state agencies formed the Governance Group. Partner agencies included: Iowa Workforce Development, Department of Human Services, Department of Education, Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services and Department of Human Rights. The group was developed in response to a Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) request for proposals that included an advisory group for systems change efforts to expand employment opportunities to individuals with disabilities. By 2000, the five original partners had expanded their efforts by agreeing to provide oversight and consultation to a Department of Labor (DOL) Work Incentive Grant and brought on two additional partners, the Department for the Blind and the Iowa Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. (1/2011)

North Carolina: Using an Outcomes-based Long Term Vocational Services Funding Model

In North Carolina, counties have been consolidated into Local Management Entities (LMEs). These entities contract for services with community providers and provide oversight on access, utilization, best practices, and community collaborations. The Mecklenberg County LME established the Best Practices Community Committee, comprising service providers, individuals and family members, advocacy agencies, community partners, interested community volunteers, and LME staff. Sub-committees addressed several areas, including employment. Based on their recommendations, a pilot project that uses an outcome-based funding model for follow-along employment services was developed. (7/2009)

Mandatory Situational Assessments in Tennessee

Tennessee implemented it’s Employment First initiative in 2002 with a goal of making employment the first day service option for adults receiving supports from the Department of Mental Retardation Services. As part of the Employment First initiative, the state requires a periodic community-based work assessment for all individuals not currently employed in the community. State-contracted and independent individualized support coordinators ensure that individuals who are not in integrated employment participate in a community-based work assessment at least every three years. Since December 2005, employment providers can be trained in conducting situational job assessments and the importance of providing these opportunities. (7/2009)

Using Employment Data to Create Area-specific Employment Goals in Massachusetts

In 2002, the Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS) developed a contractual requirement that employment service provider performance be tracked through outcome measures. As a result, DDS shaped its employment data collection system to focus on what it viewed as key outcomes for measuring success around employment.  A confluence of factors including participation in the National Core Indicator project, a new Request for Responses (RFR) for Employment Support Services that emphasized performance measurement, and DDS’s intrinsic commitment to greater community employment supported the development of an employment data system that focused on individual outcomes. Data from this effort is now being used to help each area office create employment goals with their employment providers. (7/2009)

Working Together: Collaboration between Colorado’s Developmental Disabilities Division and Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

Promising Practice: Colorado (1/2009)

Carrie: Natural supports at work

Carrie is a woman in her forties who works in the kitchen of a small private school. This is her first job in the community. She enjoys reciprocal, caring relationships with several of her coworkers. The natural support of her colleagues has enabled her to be successful at her job and form friendships that extend beyond the workday. (11/2008)

Integrated Employment Outcomes Through Person-to-Person Technical Assistance: New Hampshire

New Hampshire implemented an innovative technical assistance model that promoted organizational change to expand individual employment opportunities. This person-to-person change began at the micro level but "trickled up" through organizations across the state. (1/2007)

Washington State's Working-Age Adult Policy

Washington's Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) has recently issued a new policy which went into full effect on July 1, 2006. This policy "designates employment supports as the primary method of furnishing state-financed day services to adult participants." Emphasizing community employment as the primary service option, the policy further states that: "services for persons under the age of 62 that do not emphasize the pursuit or maintenance of employment in integrated settings can be authorized only by exception to policy" (WA DHSH, DDD, "County Services for Working Age Adults" Policy 4.11). Initially adopted in 2004, this policy does not eliminate sheltered employment or community access services; rather, it focuses supports towards gainful employment. (0/2007)

Case Studies of Local Boards and One-Stop Centers: Strategies for Maximizing Staff Competence When Supporting Job Seekers with Disabilities

This series of products offers practical solutions for Local Workforce Investment Boards and One-Stop Career Centers as they strive to serve all customers, including those with disabilities. One-Stops that effectively serve job seekers with disabilities spend energy and resources on staff development and training, although even with these efforts there continue to be concerns about One-Stop staff members' understanding of disability issues and employment. (10/2004)

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Merging Cultures

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities. (3/2003)

High-Performing States in Integrated Employment

Despite recent improvements, community employment outcomes vary widely across states. This report highlights successful practices of states that were identified as "high performers" in integrated employment for people served by state MR/DD agencies. (2/2003)

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Spotlight on Kentucky

The implementation of WIA requires major organizational change for employment and training agencies. These publications highlight findings from case studies in three states and identify how states have begun to collaborate and the subsequent impact on people with disabilities. (7/2002)

The Influence of Families on the Employment Process

Family is important for many reasons: family members can motivate people to work, and can help them understand why work is important. Families can also have a big influence on self-determination and empowerment, helping people develop a real understanding of themselves and their place in the workplace. Their involvement is important throughout a person's life. (6/2011)

Employment Data Systems : New Hampshire's Bureau of Developmental Services

The increasing emphasis on government accountability at the state and federal levels has increased interest in and use of outcome data. Moreover, research has found that high performing states in integrated employment generally have a clear and visible data collection system that provides individual outcome data (Hall et al, 2007). But what are the most important elements in designing and using a system? Stakeholders have raised questions regarding creating effective data collection systems, identifying variables with the most utility for influencing policy, and using data as a strategic planning tool. This series is intended to shed light on the successes and challenges of collecting data on day and employment services across several states and to provide strategies for other states as they examine their own data collection systems and their impact on their employment priorities for individuals with ID/DD. During the Spring and Summer of 2008, ICI researchers conducted interviews with state and local key informants who had been recommended as being knowledgeable about their state's data collection system. State policy documents and state websites were also used as resources. (3/2011)

Pushing the Integrated Employment Agenda: Case Study Research in Washington State

This is the second in a series of publications highlighting findings from case studies in three states that are recognized as high performers in integrated employment. Respondents discuss their success and how they handled challenges. (6/2006)

Case Studies of Local Boards and One-Stop Centers: Tackling Fiscal Issues

This series of products offers practical solutions for Local Workforce Investment Boards and One-Stop Career Centers as they strive to serve all customers, including those with disabilities. In addition to service delivery, WIA encourages One-Stop partners to share in the operating costs of the One-Stop. While the potential benefits are clear, the practicalities can be complex. This brief shares some of the strategies that One-Stop partners have used to address this challenge. (9/2004)

Innovations in Employment Supports: New Hampshire's State Division of Developmental Services

Between 1988 and 2001, New Hampshire's Division of Developmental Services transformed the state's day and employment services from a facility-based model to an inclusion model that supports 94% of its individuals in the community. This brief highlights several factors contributing to New Hampshire's employment outcomes. (5/2004)

Innovations in Employment Supports: Washington State's Division of Developmental Disabilities

As evidence of the positive outcomes associated with integrated employment develops it is important to identify policy and practices at the state level that expand access to employment opportunity. This brief presents findings from Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) case study research focused on state agencies that support individuals with developmental disabilities. (8/2003)

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Co-location

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities. (1/2003)

Washington: Promoting public sector jobs for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities

King County's program to employ people with disabilities in county jobs is an example of Washington's commitment to the use of innovative approaches to increase integrated employment. In 1989, a training resource funded by Washington State and the county Division of Developmental Disabilities, O'Neill and Associates, submitted a grant application to the Rehabilitation Services Administration to develop public sector jobs for people with developmental disabilities within the state. These jobs were to be concentrated in King County (Seattle area) government because of the availability of high-paying jobs with benefits. With the political assistance of a King County councilor, the County approved a resolution to encourage county departments to hire people with developmental disabilities in 1990 (Mank, O'Neill, & Jenson, 1998). Over the past 15 years, this project has experienced tremendous expansion and replication.

Pushing the Integrated Employment Agenda: Case Study Research in Tennessee

State intellectual disabilities/developmental disabilities (IDDD) agencies vary widely in their investment in integrated employment as part of their overall day and employment supports. This brief is part of a series of publications highlighting findings from case studies in states that have developed initiatives to expand integrated employment. These products are intended to be a practical resource for other states as they work to help people with disabilities obtain and maintain gainful employment.

StateData: The National Report on Employment Services and Outcomes

The StateData employment report is a product of Access to Integrated Employment, a project of the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) at the University of Massachusetts Boston, supported in part by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under cooperative agreement #90DN0216. The opinions contained in this report are those of the grantee and do not necessarily reflect those of the funders. (5/2012)

Employment Data Systems : Washington State's Division of Developmental Disabilities

The increasing emphasis on government accountability at the state and federal levels has increased interest in and use of outcome data. Moreover, research has found that high performing states in integrated employment generally have a clear and visible data collection system that provides individual outcome data (Hall, Butterworth, Winsor, Gilmore, & Metzel, 2007). But what are the most important elements in designing and using such a system? Stakeholders have raised questions regarding creating effective data collection systems, identifying variables with the most utility for influencing policy, and using data as a strategic planning tool. This series is intended to shed light on the successes and challenges of collecting data on day and employment services across several states and to provide strategies for other states as they examine their own data collection systems and the systems' impact on their priorities for employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). During the spring and summer of 2008, Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) researchers conducted interviews with key state and local informants who were recommended as being knowledgeable about their states' data collection system. State policy documents and state websites also contributed to data collection. (3/2011)

Innovations in Employment Supports: Colorado's State Division of Developmental Services

Between the years of 1985 and 1996 Colorado experienced significant growth in integrated employment for people with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. Several factors were consistently highlighted as contributing to Colorado's employment outcomes during this period. (7/2005)

Pushing the Integrated Employment Agenda: Case Study Research in New Hampshire

Employment for people with severe disabilities was legitimized in P.L. 99457. However, some states have made more progress than others in helping individuals with disabilities achieve successful employment outcomes. New Hampshire was identified as a "high-performing" state based on criteria aimed at assessing overall commitment to community inclusion. This case study examines the reasons behind the state's success. (6/2005)

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Accessibility

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities. (3/2003)

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Leadership

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities. (3/2003)

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Involving People with Disabilities

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities. (2/2003)

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Spotlight on Maine

The implementation of WIA requires major organizational change for employment and training agencies. These publications highlight findings from case studies in three states and identify how states have begun to collaborate and the subsequent impact on people with disabilities. (10/2002)

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Spotlight on Minnesota

The implementation of WIA requires major organizational change for employment and training agencies. These publications highlight findings from case studies in three states and identify how states have begun to collaborate and the subsequent impact on people with disabilities. (7/2002)

VR Outcome Trends and the Recent Decline in Employment for VR Customers with Intellectual Disabilities

VR Outcome Trends and the Recent Decline in Employment for VR Customers with Intellectual Disabilities (2/2012)

ICI: promoting inclusion for people with disabilities