ICI publications by Melanie Jordan

Supporting Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Quality Employment Practices

It has been known for decades that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including those with significant impairment or who have behaviors that others find challenging, can work when they are given appropriate supports (Smith, Belcher, & Juhrs, 1995). It is also clear that individuals with ASD can benefit from employment. Benefits include improved emotional state, greater financial gain, decreased anxiety, greater self-esteem, and greater independence (Mawhood & Howlin, 1999; Hurlbutt & Chalmers, 2004). Nonetheless, employment outcomes for individuals with ASD have traditionally been poor (Bilstedt, Gilberg, & Gilberg, 2005; Howlin, Goode, Hutton, & Rutter, 2004). Even those who do find work are often underemployed or do not hold onto jobs for a long period of time (Mawhood & Howlin, 1999). (12/2008)

Massachusetts Public and Subsidized Housing Tenants: Know Your Rights! Get a Rent Freeze When You Go to Work

A guide to help MA public housing tenants with disabilities keep their rent stable when they get a job. (1/2007)

Rent Freeze Basics for Public and Subsidized Housing Tenants Who Go to Work: A Guide for Mass. Community Service Providers

For some tenants, rent freeze incentive policies can minimize the impact that increased earnings will have on rent. Under a rent freeze, when an eligible tenant gets a job after a period of unemployment, the rent will stay flat-- that is, not go up-- for a period of time. This companion guide explains the policies and eligibility guidelines. (1/2007)

Starting with Me: A Guide to Person-Centered Planning for Job Seekers

A person-centered approach can help individuals with disabilities make satisfying job choices. This brief guides job seekers through a three-stage career development process that includes assessing their interests, researching the job market, and marketing themselves to potential employers. (7/2002)

Evaluating Your Agency and Its Services: A Checklist for Job Seekers with Disabilities

It is important to evaluate employment services and decide if you are getting the results that you are looking for. You should have high expectations! If you are currently using an agency for help with employment, this checklist can help you make sure you are getting what you need. (9/2002)

School Days to Pay Days

Collaboratively designed by ICI and the Department of Developmental Services, this booklet will help families get started with the school-to-work transition process. Readers will learn about resources, services, and programs available for young adults with intellectual disabilities in Massachusetts; and find inspiration in the many success stories of young adults who have secured fulfilling employment with appropriate supports.

Making Experiential Education Accessible for Students with Disabilities

College students with disabilities enter with less work experience and have a harder time finding jobs than their nondisabled peers. Experiential education-- mentoring, internships, job shadowing, and so on-- can create a bridge to graduation and employment. However, that requires college professionals to consider access issues for all students. A new Institute Brief provides basic disability awareness information, suggests ways to create welcoming career offices, and offers ideas to increase access to experiential education. (11/2004)

Campus Career Development Services: Promoting Inclusive Practices

Information and suggestions for college career services offices to help them reach students who have disabilities. (4/2003)

One-Stop Centers: A Guide for Job Seekers with Disabilities

General information about the One-Stop system and answers to specific questions individuals with disabilities may have about One-Stop services. (2/2000)

When Existing Jobs Don't Fit: A Guide to Job Creation

Successful job development for people with disabilities is about meeting the specific and often unique needs of each job seeker. Job creation is a way to modify or restructure existing jobs or bring together a combination of job tasks that fill the work needs of an employer while capitalizing on the skills and strengths of workers with significant disabilities. This is the second issue in the new ICI Professional Development Series. (9/2004)

Demystifying Job Development: Field-Based Approaches to Job Development for People with Disabilities

Developing new job opportunities remains one of the most difficult tasks for employment professionals. This book provides the core strategies to successfully place people with disabilities in quality community jobs, highlighting social inclusion and natural supports, and focusing on what each person wants to do and can do now, rather than on what they need to change to become "job ready." (1/2000)

ICI: promoting inclusion for people with disabilities