ICI publications by Jean E. Winsor

Vocational Rehabilitation Closure Trends for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: A Snapshot of Five U.S. Territories

Vocational Rehabilitation Closure Trends for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: A Snapshot of Five U.S. Territories (2/2014)

Growth in Community-based Non-work

A excerpt from the 2011 statedata book (11/2012)

State Intellectual and Developmental Disability Agencies' Service Trends

State Intellectual and Developmental Disability Agencies' Service Trends (4/2012)

State Intellectual and Developmental Disability Agencies' Service Trends

In FY2010, an estimated 566,188 individuals received day or employment supports from state intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) agencies. This number grew from 458,650 in FY1999, a 23.4 percent increase. The estimated number of individuals supported in integrated employment services increased from 108,296 in FY1999 to 113,937 in FY2010, a 5.2% increase. State investment in supports continues to emphasize facility-based and non-work services rather than integrated employment services. Figure 1 shows the trends in the percentage of people served in integrated employment and facility-based and non-work settings between FY2004 and FY2010. (3/2012)

Decline in the Provision of Facility-Based Work Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Decline in the Provision of Facility-Based Work Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (11/2011)

State Intellectual and Developmental Disability Agencies' Funding for Employment Services

The National Survey of State Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Day and Employment Services is a longitudinal study commissioned by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities to analyze community-based day and employment service trends between FY1988 and FY2009 for individuals with IDD and closely related conditions. (7/2011)

Employment Data Systems : New Hampshire's Bureau of Developmental Services

The increasing emphasis on government accountability at the state and federal levels has increased interest in and use of outcome data. Moreover, research has found that high performing states in integrated employment generally have a clear and visible data collection system that provides individual outcome data (Hall et al, 2007). But what are the most important elements in designing and using a system? Stakeholders have raised questions regarding creating effective data collection systems, identifying variables with the most utility for influencing policy, and using data as a strategic planning tool. This series is intended to shed light on the successes and challenges of collecting data on day and employment services across several states and to provide strategies for other states as they examine their own data collection systems and their impact on their employment priorities for individuals with ID/DD. During the Spring and Summer of 2008, ICI researchers conducted interviews with state and local key informants who had been recommended as being knowledgeable about their state's data collection system. State policy documents and state websites were also used as resources. (3/2011)

Employment Data Systems : Washington State's Division of Developmental Disabilities

The increasing emphasis on government accountability at the state and federal levels has increased interest in and use of outcome data. Moreover, research has found that high performing states in integrated employment generally have a clear and visible data collection system that provides individual outcome data (Hall, Butterworth, Winsor, Gilmore, & Metzel, 2007). But what are the most important elements in designing and using such a system? Stakeholders have raised questions regarding creating effective data collection systems, identifying variables with the most utility for influencing policy, and using data as a strategic planning tool. This series is intended to shed light on the successes and challenges of collecting data on day and employment services across several states and to provide strategies for other states as they examine their own data collection systems and the systems' impact on their priorities for employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). During the spring and summer of 2008, Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) researchers conducted interviews with key state and local informants who were recommended as being knowledgeable about their states' data collection system. State policy documents and state websites also contributed to data collection. (3/2011)

State Intellectual and Developmental Disability Agencies' Service Trends

Since Fiscal Year 1988, the Institute for Community Inclusion has administered the National Survey of Day and Employment Programs for People with Developmental Disabilities to state Intellectual and Developmental Disability (IDD) Agencies. The work is funded by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities and is designed to describe the nature of day and employment services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (1/2011)

National Day and Employment Service Trends in MR/DD Agencies

The data represented here describe the core elements of ICI's National Survey of Day and Employment Services. Integrated employment includes both individual employment and group supported employment and facility-based settings include both facility-based work services and facility-based non-work services. Reported participation in community-based non-work services, defined as non job-related supports focusing on community involvement and typically identified as community integration or community participation services, has steadily increased since this service was added to the survey in 1996, growing from 14.5% in 1999 to 21% in 2004. (9/2007)

The Tennessee Employment Consortium (TEC): A Statewide Collaboration for Change

The Tennessee Employment Consortium (TEC) is a statewide organization focused on increasing the number of Tennesseans in integrated employment. The consortium comprises volunteers from the state's Division of Mental Retardation Services (DMRS) and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities, the ARC of Tennessee, the Center on Disability and Employment at the University of Tennessee, community rehabilitation providers (CRPs), family members, and other stakeholders. TEC's ability to organize collaborative activities across state agencies, advocacy organizations, and CRPs has played an important role in increasing integrated employment outcomes. (6/2007)

Employment First! Making Integrated Employment the Preferred Outcome in Tennessee

The goal of Employment First was to make employment the first day service option for adults receiving supports funded by DMRS, Medicaid, or the state. (1/2007)

Pushing the Integrated Employment Agenda: Case Study Research in Washington State

This is the second in a series of publications highlighting findings from case studies in three states that are recognized as high performers in integrated employment. Respondents discuss their success and how they handled challenges. (6/2006)

Innovations in Employment Supports: Colorado's State Division of Developmental Services

Between the years of 1985 and 1996 Colorado experienced significant growth in integrated employment for people with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. Several factors were consistently highlighted as contributing to Colorado's employment outcomes during this period. (7/2005)

Pushing the Integrated Employment Agenda: Case Study Research in New Hampshire

Employment for people with severe disabilities was legitimized in P.L. 99457. However, some states have made more progress than others in helping individuals with disabilities achieve successful employment outcomes. New Hampshire was identified as a "high-performing" state based on criteria aimed at assessing overall commitment to community inclusion. This case study examines the reasons behind the state's success. (6/2005)

Patterns of State, County, and Local ID/DD Funding Allocation

State, County, and Local ID/DD dollars are one of the largest sources of funds for day and employment services; additionally as a funding source that is directly controlled within each state it is one of the most flexible sources of dollars for day and employment services. As Figure 1 shows, the allocation of these funds varied based upon year and service category: integrated employment, community based non-work, facility based work, and facility based non-work. (9/9)

Community employment training by and for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in Tennessee

Project Income was a joint venture between the Tennessee Microboards Association (statewide organization that supports individual microboards, which procure and oversee supports and services) and People First of Tennessee (a statewide self-advocacy organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities). The focus of the project was to educate people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) and their families about the benefits of and opportunities for community employment.

Pushing the Integrated Employment Agenda: Case Study Research in Tennessee

State intellectual disabilities/developmental disabilities (IDDD) agencies vary widely in their investment in integrated employment as part of their overall day and employment supports. This brief is part of a series of publications highlighting findings from case studies in states that have developed initiatives to expand integrated employment. These products are intended to be a practical resource for other states as they work to help people with disabilities obtain and maintain gainful employment.

Washington: Collaborating with a Community College and a Supported-Employment Agency to Facilitate the Transition From High School to Community Employment

Since 2006, the Shoreline Public School District in King County, Washington has partnered with Shoreline Community College (SCC) to offer an off-campus transition program for young adults with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). While participants are still in high school, the Community Based Transition Program offers a structured step between their high-school and post-secondary education and employment in the community.

State Intellectual and Developmental Disability Agencies' Service Trends

DataNote No.44

Are Young Adults With Intellectual Disabilities Getting Work Experiences from Participating in the Vocational Rehabilitation Program?

To learn about whether young adults with intellectual disabilities in the vocational rehabilitation (VR) program are getting work experience, we examined the age at application of people with intellectual disabilities who exited the VR program in 2012. (8/2014)

State Trends in the Vocational Rehabilitation Engagement of Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: 2002-2011

Rehabilitation Engagement of Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities (5/2013)

Collaboration between State Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Agencies and State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies: Results of a National Survey

Do state intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) agencies collaborate with their vocational rehabilitation (VR) counterparts? If so, in what ways and how formalized are these collaborative efforts? This Research to Practice Brief provides answers to those and other questions. (4/2011)

Employment Data Systems : Florida's Agency for Persons with Disabilities

The increasing emphasis on government accountability at the state and federal levels has increased interest in and use of outcome data. Moreover, research has found that high performing states in integrated employment generally have a clear and visible data collection system that provides individual outcome data (Hall et al, 2007). But what are the most important elements in designing and using a system? Stakeholders have raised questions regarding creating effective data collection systems, identifying variables with the most utility for influencing policy, and using data as a strategic planning tool. This series is intended to shed light on the successes and challenges of day and employment systems across several states and to provide strategies for other states as they examine their own data collection systems and their impact on their employment priorities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). (3/2011)

Tracking Employment and Day Support Participation and Outcomes in State Intellectual Disability and Developmental Disability Agencies

Data set: The 2007 National Survey of Day and Employment Programs Institute for Community Inclusion, State Data Project (11/2008)

State Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Agencies Expenditures for Integrated Employment Services

Data set: The National Survey of Day and Employment Programs (4/2008)

Colorado's Ad Hoc Committee on Employment and Community Participation

The Ad Hoc Committee on Employment and Community Participation began meeting in the winter of 2004 in an effort to promote integrated employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Colorado. The committee was comprised of representatives from the Division for Developmental Disabilities (DDD) administration; the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; local Community Centered Boards (private nonprofit organizations responsible for authorizing services); advocacy groups; and self-advocates, parents, and service providers.

Washington: Promoting public sector jobs for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities

King County's program to employ people with disabilities in county jobs is an example of Washington's commitment to the use of innovative approaches to increase integrated employment. In 1989, a training resource funded by Washington State and the county Division of Developmental Disabilities, O'Neill and Associates, submitted a grant application to the Rehabilitation Services Administration to develop public sector jobs for people with developmental disabilities within the state. These jobs were to be concentrated in King County (Seattle area) government because of the availability of high-paying jobs with benefits. With the political assistance of a King County councilor, the County approved a resolution to encourage county departments to hire people with developmental disabilities in 1990 (Mank, O'Neill, & Jenson, 1998). Over the past 15 years, this project has experienced tremendous expansion and replication.

Support through Mentorship: Accessible Supervision of Employees with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Effective supervision of employees with intellectual or developmental disabilities can be challenging for businesses that may not have experience in hiring people with diverse support requirements. This is largely due to the relatively low participation rates of people with disabilities in the workforce. This is, thankfully, changing as more businesses are seeing the value of diversifying their workforce, which includes hiring people with diverse cognitive abilities like people with intellectual or developmental disabilities. (8/2013)

The Power of Friendship

Friendship is important for all of us! This includes people with and without disabilities. People often feel better and happier when they have friends. As part of a research project about the choices people with disabilities make about work, we interviewed 16 people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD). These people also chose family members and professional staff people for us to interview. We asked them how they made decisions about working and making friends. (6/2011)

Examining Collaboration between State Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Agencies and State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies

Since Fiscal Year 1988, the Institute for Community Inclusion has administered the National Survey of State Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Agencies' Day and Employment Services. The FY 2009 survey included a module to assess the ways in which state intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) agencies collaborate with their state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies to support integrated employment outcomes for adults with IDD. A total of 40 agencies responded to the module. Their responses provide a broader understanding of the relationship between the two types of state agencies, and the ways in which they work together to provide integrated employment services. (3/2011)

StateData: The National Report on Employment Services and Outcomes

The StateData employment report is a product of Access to Integrated Employment, a project of the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) at the University of Massachusetts Boston, supported in part by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under cooperative agreement #90DN0216. The opinions contained in this report are those of the grantee and do not necessarily reflect those of the funders. (5/2012)

ICI: promoting inclusion for people with disabilities