ICI publications by Jean E. Winsor

State Intellectual and Developmental Disability Agencies' Funding for Employment Services

The National Survey of State Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Day and Employment Services is a longitudinal study commissioned by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities to analyze community-based day and employment service trends between FY1988 and FY2009 for individuals with IDD and closely related conditions. (7/2011)

Employment Data Systems : New Hampshire's Bureau of Developmental Services

The increasing emphasis on government accountability at the state and federal levels has increased interest in and use of outcome data. Moreover, research has found that high performing states in integrated employment generally have a clear and visible data collection system that provides individual outcome data (Hall et al, 2007). But what are the most important elements in designing and using a system? Stakeholders have raised questions regarding creating effective data collection systems, identifying variables with the most utility for influencing policy, and using data as a strategic planning tool. This series is intended to shed light on the successes and challenges of collecting data on day and employment services across several states and to provide strategies for other states as they examine their own data collection systems and their impact on their employment priorities for individuals with ID/DD. During the Spring and Summer of 2008, ICI researchers conducted interviews with state and local key informants who had been recommended as being knowledgeable about their state's data collection system. State policy documents and state websites were also used as resources. (3/2011)

Employment Data Systems : Washington State's Division of Developmental Disabilities

The increasing emphasis on government accountability at the state and federal levels has increased interest in and use of outcome data. Moreover, research has found that high performing states in integrated employment generally have a clear and visible data collection system that provides individual outcome data (Hall, Butterworth, Winsor, Gilmore, & Metzel, 2007). But what are the most important elements in designing and using such a system? Stakeholders have raised questions regarding creating effective data collection systems, identifying variables with the most utility for influencing policy, and using data as a strategic planning tool. This series is intended to shed light on the successes and challenges of collecting data on day and employment services across several states and to provide strategies for other states as they examine their own data collection systems and the systems' impact on their priorities for employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). During the spring and summer of 2008, Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) researchers conducted interviews with key state and local informants who were recommended as being knowledgeable about their states' data collection system. State policy documents and state websites also contributed to data collection. (3/2011)

State Intellectual and Developmental Disability Agencies' Service Trends

Since Fiscal Year 1988, the Institute for Community Inclusion has administered the National Survey of Day and Employment Programs for People with Developmental Disabilities to state Intellectual and Developmental Disability (IDD) Agencies. The work is funded by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities and is designed to describe the nature of day and employment services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (1/2011)

National Day and Employment Service Trends in MR/DD Agencies

The data represented here describe the core elements of ICI's National Survey of Day and Employment Services. Integrated employment includes both individual employment and group supported employment and facility-based settings include both facility-based work services and facility-based non-work services. Reported participation in community-based non-work services, defined as non job-related supports focusing on community involvement and typically identified as community integration or community participation services, has steadily increased since this service was added to the survey in 1996, growing from 14.5% in 1999 to 21% in 2004. (9/2007)

ICI: promoting inclusion for people with disabilities