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Publications related to One-Stop Centers/workforce

Job Seekers with Disabilities at One-Stop Career Centers: An Examination of Registration for Wagner-Peyser Funded Employment Services from 2002 to 2007

DataNote No. 25, 2009

The Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933 established a nationwide system of public employment services, known as the Employment Service. Wagner-Peyser funds are a primary source of funding for the services of One–Stop Career Centers that provide employment services available to all people, including people with disabilities. This data note examines trends on a national and state-by-state basis in the number and percentage of job seekers who self-identified as having disabilities who register for Wagner-Peyser Employment Services. Readers should note that because disability status in this data source is self-identified, it is likely disability among job seekers who register for Wagner-Peyser services is underreported and the actual numbers of people with disabilities who register for services are higher.

Access for All Customers: Universal Strategies for One-Stop Career Centers

Institute Brief Issue No. 26

One-Stop Career Centers serve a diverse range of customers. These include individuals with a variety of educational and work backgrounds, people from diverse racial, linguistic and ethnic cultures, as well as individuals with a wide range of disabilities and support needs. One way of addressing the needs of this diverse customer base is to develop services and systems that respond to the needs of each of these groups. However, this can be expensive and labor-intensive. A more effective way to serve this broad customer pool is to provide One-Stop services according to the principles of what is known as "universal design," using common strategies that benefit many groups – and that reinforce the concept of an inclusive setting that welcomes and celebrates diversity. To find a manageable approach to meet the needs of their many customers, One-Stop Career Centers can think universally about how they design their physical space, service delivery systems, and customer resources. For example, the barriers faced by people who cannot read are similar despite the cause (e.g. cognitive disability, illiteracy, or limited English proficiency). Therefore, the strategies to overcome this barrier and allow customers to benefit from One-Stop services will be similar.
This proactive approach lessens the extent of service specialization that may be required to meet the needs of some audiences. When services are designed universally, they are more likely to benefit job seekers with a wide range of learning styles, languages, educational levels, intelligences, and abilities, allowing the One-Stop to meet customer needs in a more efficient fashion.

One-Stop Collaborations: The Key to Expanding Your Workforce Connections

MassWorks 6, 2008

Finding ways to collaborate with the mainstream workforce system can not only expand the opportunities for the people you serve but position your organization as a valuable resource to the workforce development system.

WIA Employment Outcomes

Data Note 6, 2006

The U.S. Department of Labor tracks several performance measures for people served in the One-Stop system. This Data Note focuses on people with disabilities in two funding categories. Data set: WIA.

Access for All: A Resource Manual for Meeting the Needs of One-Stop Customers with Disabilities

Resource Guide 6

This comprehensive manual is designed to enhance the ability of One-Stop Career Centers to meet the needs of people with disabilities, and provides practical information on a variety of topics, including etiquette; job development and accommodations; working with the disability service system; legal guidelines; and extensive resources.

One-Stop Centers: A Guide for Job Seekers with Disabilities

Tools for Inclusion 10

General information about the One-Stop system and answers to specific questions individuals with disabilities may have about One-Stop services.

Recruitment and Retention of Older Workers: Considerations for Employers

The National Center on Workforce Development/Adult (NCWD/A), funded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), undertook a one-year project that examined practices and strategies implemented by U.S. companies seeking to recruit and retain older workers. This brief presents themes that emerged from phone conversations with employees at 18 companies in 13 states. Five of those companies subsequently participated in more in-depth, in-person visits. NCWD/A staff held phone conversations with human resource or diversity program representatives; during in-person visits, researchers had discussions with a wide range of informants, from company leadership to frontline supervisors/managers and older workers themselves. This brief presents the motivational factors that drove companies to focus on older workers, the cultural contexts of businesses that have undertaken these practices, and the range of recruitment and retention practices and initiatives they used. Researchers offer suggestions to employers on the relevance of the findings to their own workplace practices, initiatives, and cultures.

Recruitment and Retention of Older Workers: Application to People with Disabilities

The National Center on Workforce Development/Adult (NCWD/A), funded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), undertook a one-year project that examined practices and strategies implemented by U.S. companies seeking to recruit and retain older workers. This brief presents themes that emerged from phone conversations with employees at 18 companies in 13 states. Five of those companies subsequently participated in more in-depth, in-person visits. NCWD/A staff held phone conversations with human resource or diversity program representatives; during in-person visits, researchers had discussions with a wide range of informants, from company leadership to frontline supervisors/managers and older workers themselves. This brief identifies strategies that can benefit both older workers and workers with disabilities. It describes each strategy that companies discussed in relation to older workers and makes a case for its effectiveness in employing workers with disabilities, offering action steps employers can take. The brief ends with recommendations for the disability community to better support businesses to employ people with disabilities. Including these practices in business operations will position employers to become more reflective of their diverse communities and the customers they strive to serve.

Self-Determination: A Fundamental Ingredient of Employment Support

Tools for Inclusion 22

Persons with disabilities should direct their own job searches, from determining their interests and goals to researching employment opportunities to starting a new job. Doing so increases their sense of empowerment and can contribute to their employment success. Employment professionals have a facilitating role to play in the process. Job seeker self-determination practices should drive employment services' coordination, funding, and implementation.

Massachusetts Leaders Take on Education Reform with Input from New Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce (2/28/07)

Institute for Community Inclusion and College of Management Announce Workforce Training Initiative

Education and workforce leaders gathered today at UMass Boston to discuss Tough Choices or Tough Times, a clarion call for change in the education and workforce systems. In response to this challenge, the new ICI/COM effort addresses the core concerns of the progressive workforce system.

Case Studies of Local Boards and One-Stop Centers: Underutilization of One-Stops by People with Significant Disabilities

Case Studies 13

This series of products offers practical solutions for Local Workforce Investment Boards and One-Stop Career Centers as they strive to serve all customers, including those with disabilities. Existing data indicates that people with disabilities underutilize One-Stops. The disproportionately high rate of unemployment among people with disabilities makes this a critical issue. However, many One-Stops have created successful strategies to improve access.

Taking the Mystery Out of Customer Service

Institute Brief 18

With the current emphasis on universal access to employment services for all members of the community, the workforce development field needs to evaluate service delivery. A "mystery shopper" program is one of many evaluation tools available to ensure continuous quality improvement and customer satisfaction. This technique allows organizations to collect data on the experiences of One-Stop Career Center customers from the customer perspective. The brief includes a sample shopper questionnaire.

Case Studies of Local Boards and One-Stop Centers: Strategies for Maximizing Staff Competence When Supporting Job Seekers with Disabilities

Case Studies 12

This series of products offers practical solutions for Local Workforce Investment Boards and One-Stop Career Centers as they strive to serve all customers, including those with disabilities. One-Stops that effectively serve job seekers with disabilities spend energy and resources on staff development and training, although even with these efforts there continue to be concerns about One-Stop staff members' understanding of disability issues and employment.

Creative Involvement of Community-Based Disability Organizations

Case Studies 11

This series of products offers practical solutions for Local Workforce Investment Boards and One-Stop Career Centers as they strive to serve all customers, including those with disabilities. WIA facilitates partnerships to improve service delivery. Although the state Vocational Rehabilitation agency is the only mandated disability partner, community-based organizations can also work with One-Stops.

Case Studies of Local Boards and One-Stop Centers: Levels of Involvement of State VR Agencies with Other One-Stop Partners

Case Studies 10

This series of products offers practical solutions for Local Workforce Investment Boards and One-Stop Career Centers as they strive to serve all customers, including those with disabilities. Although WIA's requirements for VR participation are clear, the parameters are flexible. Defining the role of VR has had its challenges, but there are numerous examples of VR agencies working creatively to establish effective partnerships.

Case Studies of Local Boards and One-Stop Centers: Tackling Fiscal Issues

Case Studies 9

This series of products offers practical solutions for Local Workforce Investment Boards and One-Stop Career Centers as they strive to serve all customers, including those with disabilities. In addition to service delivery, WIA encourages One-Stop partners to share in the operating costs of the One-Stop. While the potential benefits are clear, the practicalities can be complex. This brief shares some of the strategies that One-Stop partners have used to address this challenge.

Massachusetts Launches the Disability Program Navigator Initiative

MassWorks 1

This March ICI debuted a newsletter for Massachusetts disability, employment, and workforce professionals. It can be hard to find time to exchange resources and collaborate. MassWorks has information we hope will help you do your job. The first issue highlights the new disability program navigator initiative at Career Centers.

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Accessibility

Case Studies 6

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities.

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Leadership

Case Studies 7

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities.

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Merging Cultures

Case Studies 8

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities.

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Involving People with Disabilities

Case Studies 5

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities.

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Focus on Co-location

Case Studies 4

The many changes mandated by WIA create opportunities and challenges. These lessons from the field offer practical solutions for state and local entities and are intended to stimulate discussion, creativity, and thoughtful planning among members of the workforce and disability communities.

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Spotlight on Maine

Case Studies 3

The implementation of WIA requires major organizational change for employment and training agencies. These publications highlight findings from case studies in three states and identify how states have begun to collaborate and the subsequent impact on people with disabilities.

One-Stop Career Centers and the New Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program: Access for All in Workforce Development

OneStops.info Brief 2

This edition of OneStops.info gives an overview of the major provisions in the final regulations implementing the Ticket to Work program, and describes the factors a One-Stop may want to consider before determining whether and how to get involved in this new program.

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Spotlight on Kentucky

Case Studies 1

The implementation of WIA requires major organizational change for employment and training agencies. These publications highlight findings from case studies in three states and identify how states have begun to collaborate and the subsequent impact on people with disabilities.

Case Studies on the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act: Spotlight on Minnesota

Case Studies 2

The implementation of WIA requires major organizational change for employment and training agencies. These publications highlight findings from case studies in three states and identify how states have begun to collaborate and the subsequent impact on people with disabilities.

One-Stop Career Centers: Serving People with Disabilities

OneStops.info Brief 1

Why should a One-Stop Career Center serve people with disabilities? What are the requirements? What resources are available to help? This article provides guidelines and success stories for One-Stops in their quest for better services for all customers.

WIA and One-Stop Centers: Opportunities and Issues for the Disability Community

Institute Brief 13

This brief gives a basic overview of the act and examines its impact on the lives of people with disabilities as well as the systems and organizations that assist them.

Provisions in the Workforce Investment Act Relating to Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability and the Development by the Governor of a Written Methods of Administration

Policy Brief 4

An outline of key provisions in the interim final regulations describing the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity responsibilities of the governor, WIA fund recipients, and programs and activities that are part of the One-Stop system.

Provisions in the Workforce Investment Act Describing the Interplay Between Workforce Investment Systems and Vocational Rehabilitation Programs

Policy Brief 1

This brief identifies the sections in Title I of the Workforce Investment Act that specifically reference the state VR program, individuals with disabilities, and organizations representing individuals with disabilities.

Press Release: New Report from ICI on Routes to Employment in US and UK - Strategies to Improve Integrated Service Delivery

In the United States and the United Kingdom there are large numbers of working age people with disabilities who are not working and claiming benefits: 10.6 million in the US and 2.64 million in the UK. This report has identified strategies that Public Employment Services activities in both the US and the UK have used in delivering services in a way that meets the more complex employment support needs of people with disabilities within systems designed for the “universal” job seeker as well as investigating how effective these strategies are in reaching that goal.

Provisions in the Final Regulations Governing the State VR Program Describing the Interplay with WIA and TWWIIA

Policy Brief 7

This brief describes the provisions of the final regulation regarding the responsibilities of Vocational Rehabilitation in the statewide workforce investment system and the relationship between VR and the Ticket to Work.

A Preliminary Analysis of the Relationship Between the Workforce Investment Act and the Federal Disability Policy Framework

This paper uses the basic conceptual framework of federal disability policy to identify Department of Labor policies regarding the needs of people with disabilities under the Workforce Investment Act.

An Accessibility Guide to Community Technology Centers in Massachusetts

Resource Guide

The product of the study is this guide about the accessibility of community technology centers (CTCs) that participated in this survey. This guide includes general information about each center, and the facility, programmatic and technology accessibility and accommodations provided to assist people with disabilities.

People with Disabilities: Having a Voice in the Creation of the New Workforce Investment System

Tools for Inclusion 11

This publication informs people with disabilities and advocates about the opportunities available for input into WIA implementation at the state and local level.

ICI: promoting inclusion for people with disabilities