Film Premiere Including Samuel

Directions to UMB

MBTA Subway or Commuter Rail with Free UMass Boston Shuttle

UMass Boston is located less than a mile from the MBTA’s JFK/UMass Station, which serves both the Red Line (subway) and the Old Colony Line (commuter rail). The university runs a regular, free shuttle bus service between the JFK/UMass stop and the campus. The shuttle bus trip normally takes less than ten minutes. For more information on MBTA schedules and routes, visit www.mbta.com or call 617-222-3200, 800-392-6100, or 617-222-5146.

Subway

Take the Red Line to JFK/UMass Station. After exiting the MBTA station, there is a free Crystal Transport shuttle bus, marked UMB Campus Center, which will carry you to the Campus Center.

Commuter Rail

Take the commuter rail to the JFK/UMass Station to the Campus Center.

The free shuttle bus runs on the following weekday schedule:

Monday – Thursday

6:40am – 9:30pm every 3-6 minutes

9:30pm – 11:30pm every 12 minutes

Bus

There are two buses running to UMass Boston. The MBTA bus stop at the UMass Boston campus is next to the front field, near the Quinn Administration Building.

Route 8: MBTA buses run daily from Kenmore Square to the campus between 5:15am and 12:30am.

Route 16: These buses run from Forest Hills to the UMass Boston campus Monday through Friday during rush hour.

UMB Shuttle bus

After exiting the MBTA station, take the first Crystal Transport bus in line marked "UMass/Subway" to the Campus Center. Inside the Campus Center, take the elevator to the third floor. Take a left out of the elevator and then your first right into a hallway. At the end of the hallway take a left and you will be at the entrances to the Campus Center Ballroom.

MBTA “The Ride”

“The Ride” offers door-to-door service for eligible people who cannot use public transit because of a physical, cognitive, or mental disability. For more information, call 617-222-5123, 800-533-6282, or 617-222-5415 (TTY); or email THERIDE@mbta.com. The best drop off location for this event is the Campus Center circle.

UMass Boston Accessible Parking and Van-Accessible Spaces

UMass Boston is committed to a welcoming environment: we exceed the number of HP spaces required by law and monitor accessibility to meet the needs of our community. Vehicles parked in our HP spaces must display a current HP hang tag or a current HP registered license plate. Special van-accessible spaces are located in the North Lot and the lower level of the Campus Center parking area. Do not park in a van-accessible space with a standard vehicle, even if you have an HP tag or plate. Please contact Customer Service Center at 617.287.4000 if you have questions regarding handicapped-accessible parking.

Driving Directions

From the North: Take Interstate 93 South through Boston to Exit 15 (Columbia Road/JFK Library). Take a left at the end of the ramp onto Columbia Road, and then take your first right into the rotary. Follow the University of Massachusetts signs along Columbia Road and Morrissey Boulevard to the campus.

From the South: Take Interstate 93 North to Exit 14 (Morrissey Boulevard/JFK Library) and follow Morrissey Boulevard north to campus.

From the West: Take the Massachusetts Turnpike (Interstate 90) east to Interstate 93. Take I-93 South one mile to Exit 15 (JFK Library/South Boston/Dorchester). Take a left at the end of the ramp onto Columbia Road, and then take your first right in the rotary. Follow the University of Massachusetts signs along Columbia Road and Morrissey Boulevard to the campus.

Once on campus: From the main entrance, follow University Drive around campus and take the 8th left into North Lot.

Parking: If you plan to park at UMass Boston, be sure to allow yourself time to find a space and walk to the Campus Center ballroom. For the Including Samuel event, the recommended parking lot is the North Lot, which is adjacent to the UMass Boston Campus Center. There is a $6 parking fee for single use.

More UMB parking information

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This event is hosted by the Institute for Community Inclusion
at the University of Massachusetts Boston and Children’s Hospital Boston,
with support from the Federation for Children with Special Needs