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Project staff: bios and contacts

Contact either researcher if you know about successful initiatives that encourage disadvantaged people to use the internet, especially e-government. We welcome your input!

Heike Boeltzig
Research Associate
Institute for Community Inclusion
University of Massachusetts-Boston
100 Morrissey Boulevard
Boston, MA 02125 USA
+1 (617) 287-4315
heike.boeltzig@umb.edu

Doria Pilling
Visiting Senior Research Fellow
Centre for Disability and Social Inclusion
Department of Interdisciplinary Studies in Professional Practice
School of Community and Health Sciences
City University London
20 Bartholomew Close
London, EC1A 7QN
d.s.pilling@city.ac.uk

Heike Boeltzig, B.A., M.Sc., is a Research Associate at the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) and a Ph.D. candidate at the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Her key research interests center on disability and employment issues. Most recently, she participated in a project funded by the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy that identified effective practices, barriers, successful strategies, and policy recommendations to better serve persons with psychiatric disabilities through the workforce development system. In addition, she is a lead researcher in a multi-year comparative policy study of One-Stop Career Centers and Workforce Investment Boards identified as providing exemplary services to customers, including those with disabilities. The research is part of the National Center on Workforce and Disability/Adult, which is funded by the U.S. DOL/ODEP. Ms. Boeltzig is also involved in survey research as the project lead on the National Survey of Community Rehabilitation Providers funded by the U.S. Administration on Developmental Disabilities.

Before joining ICI, Ms. Boeltzig conducted cross-national comparative research on disability and employment policy at the Center for Comparative Research in Social Welfare at the University of Stirling in Scotland. She also participated as a "national reporter" on German disability employment policy in a thirteen-country research project that was funded by the European Commission. A graduate of the University of Stirling, Heike has a bachelor's degree in sociology and Japanese, and a Master of Science degree in applied social research.

Doria Pilling is currently a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the Rehabilitation Resource Centre (RRC) at City University London, United Kingdom. Her key research interests focus on disability and ICT and disability and employment issues. She recently completed a project commissioned by Ofcom, the UK communications regulator, in which she led a team to investigate the feasibility of implementing additional relay services for deaf people whose needs are currently not met.

Other recent studies include the text communication needs and preferences of deaf people who do not use ordinary voice telephones, and the experiences of people with disabilities using the internet, including barriers to use (Pilling, D., Barrett, P., and Floyd, M., 2004, Disabled people and the internet: Experiences, barriers and opportunities, York: The Joseph Rowntree Foundation).

At the RRC she has carried out a number of evaluations of innovative projects that increase the employment opportunities of people with disabilities. Recently she led a project evaluating a large government-funded regeneration project in the east of England aiming to increase employability of disabled and disadvantaged groups of people. Previously, at the National Children's Bureau, she carried out a major study of factors that enable children growing up in disadvantaged circumstances to succeed in adulthood, using the National Child Development Study, a longitudinal study of some 17,000 people born in 1958 (Pilling, D., 1990, Escape from disadvantage, London: Falmer Press). Ms. Pilling holds bachelor's and master's degrees in sociology from the University of Leeds.

ICI: promoting inclusion for people with disabilities